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Queen of Katwe


FREE MOVIE SCREENING

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Queen of Katwe


FREE MOVIE SCREENING

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Join Women of Action and AIDS Healthcare Foundation on December 10th, 2016 for a special film screening of Queen of Katwe, in celebration of Human Rights Day. After the screening, all four locations will host a discussion panel to introduce topics on girls’ rights, empowerment, and health.

Find a free screening in your area

 

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Fempower


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Fempower


On National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Women Of Action participated in a women and girls festival in downtown Los Angeles. 

At this festival, WOA distributed male and female condoms and launched the fempower kit, a kit of personal hygiene products for young girls that included sanitary products and a palm card (in English and Spanish) normalizing changes of the female body, helping girls to lessen shame and stigma around their sexuality. Kits also include a 10% off discount when presented at Out of the Closet Thrift Stores. 

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It's Her Journey


A Girl's World of Adventure

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It's Her Journey


A Girl's World of Adventure

On January 1st, AHF and Women of Action teamed up to create a Rose Parade initiativethemed “A Girl’s World of Adventure: It's Her Journey. The float, which celebrated and sought to empower young girls the world over as it poignantly captured the Tournament of Roses 2016 parade theme: “Find Your Adventure," was inspired by Art Deco designs and Works Progress Administration artisans. The float featured an 11-foot spinning golden globe surrounded by four 8-foot tall floral girls from around the world dressed as potential professions girls may pursue.

The float riders: five girls aged 10 and 11—three of whom are HIV-positive—from around the US: Chicago, Florida, Arizona, Compton, and Los Angeles, spent the week in Los Angeles in the lead up to the Rose Parade event attending events meant to inspire and celebrate the girls, and bond them together through the Rose Parade experience. 


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SHE'S HER ALLY


October 11th marked International Day of the Girl Child, a United Nations-created holiday celebrating young girls around the globe and highlighting aspects of their lives that may necessitate improvement.

Numerous studies have documented how low self-esteem, loneliness, low social support, and poor coping mechanisms can result in elevated engagement in high-risk behavior.

With this in mind, Women Of Action (WOA) launched the “She’s Her Ally” initiative for 2015’s International Day of the Girl Child.

For the “She’s Her Ally” initiative, WOA crafted a day of activities for young girls (ages 5 – 13) to facilitate the communication of their hopes, fears, and dreams, build relationships in their community, and have fun—in the hopes of working towards primary prevention among HIV- girls, and adherence among HIV+ girls.

Participants at all “She’s Her Ally” events answered a series of questions which led to larger discussions. Girls then created flags, symbols of their dreams for the future. Each day ended with a game of tug-o-war, calling for the girls to work together and recognize the power of their collective strength.

“She’s Her Ally” events took place in: China, Russia, India, Mexico, Jamaica, Kenya, Nigeria, Uganda, and the United States.

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SHE'S HER ALLY


October 11th marked International Day of the Girl Child, a United Nations-created holiday celebrating young girls around the globe and highlighting aspects of their lives that may necessitate improvement.

Numerous studies have documented how low self-esteem, loneliness, low social support, and poor coping mechanisms can result in elevated engagement in high-risk behavior.

With this in mind, Women Of Action (WOA) launched the “She’s Her Ally” initiative for 2015’s International Day of the Girl Child.

For the “She’s Her Ally” initiative, WOA crafted a day of activities for young girls (ages 5 – 13) to facilitate the communication of their hopes, fears, and dreams, build relationships in their community, and have fun—in the hopes of working towards primary prevention among HIV- girls, and adherence among HIV+ girls.

Participants at all “She’s Her Ally” events answered a series of questions which led to larger discussions. Girls then created flags, symbols of their dreams for the future. Each day ended with a game of tug-o-war, calling for the girls to work together and recognize the power of their collective strength.

“She’s Her Ally” events took place in: China, Russia, India, Mexico, Jamaica, Kenya, Nigeria, Uganda, and the United States.